Getting Stronger: Discussion Forum

Discussion Topics => Rehabilitation => Topic started by: SeekingKnowledge on June 18, 2011, 06:42:08 PM

Title: Lack of sunlight causes myopia?
Post by: SeekingKnowledge on June 18, 2011, 06:42:08 PM
In light of what we've all learned here, this is clearly not the whole story but perhaps it does add another brick in our understanding...


http://www.cnn.com/2011/HEALTH/06/01/myopia.causes/index.html
Title: Re: Lack of sunlight causes myopia?
Post by: OtisBrown on June 19, 2011, 02:56:12 AM
Hi Seeking Knowlege,
That is an interesting video -- in that he acknowleges that long-term near (and perhaps lack of sun) results in negative status for the eye.  In my "seeking knowlege", I have systematically sought the judgment of medical people.  Now I know they "conflict" -- so I must sort out who is correct as science.  Here is a site that asks the question, "why" -- to develop your knowlege of those who believe that negative status can be prevented with a plus.

http://www.doyletics.com/arj/whyrvw.htm

This perhaps explains WHY Todd was successful.  It is always good to keep an open mind, and develop your own ideas about this subject.
Otis
Title: Re: Lack of sunlight causes myopia?
Post by: shadowfoot on June 19, 2011, 04:15:57 AM
SeekingKnowledge,

There is a lot more to myopia than just too much close reading. Otis posted another link at some point to a study that showed that outdoor play was more protective against myopia than anything else. I strongly concur with this point of view and the view that sunlight (time outside) is good to prevent myopia. In my personal experience, I can do close work for 4-5 hours a day without any lenses and not notice a change in vision IF I spend time outside playing with a ball and looking at leaves in the trees.
Title: Re: Lack of sunlight causes myopia?
Post by: JeremyG on January 25, 2012, 06:28:57 PM
Is it the light of the sunlight that perhaps reduces the risk of myopia? Or is it perhaps the vitamins like vitamin D that we get from the sun that helps reduce the risk? In reading that CNN article, they asked about whether kids wearing sunglasses effected the results? They said that there hadn't been any test regarding that but it would be interesting because it could lead to the finding that it's vitamin D or some other health benefit that the sun gives us that is reducing the risk.
Title: Re: Lack of sunlight causes myopia?
Post by: shadowfoot on January 26, 2012, 03:42:31 AM
JeremyG,

It's possible. Nutrition certainly has a significant role in other developmental processes. Another explanation is that getting more sunlight means being outside more, which, at least in the case of sports, leads to tracking objects and using your eyes at a sufficient distance to provide the developmental stress for optimal development. I look forward to seeing the science that will come out of this field in the next ten to twenty years and how well it dovetails with our experiences here.
Title: Re: Lack of sunlight causes myopia?
Post by: Alex_Myopic on May 08, 2019, 01:18:14 AM
In this video (at the end of it) says about an experiment with lenses in chicks. When a lens depraved the eye from focusing far away the eye became myopic. But with the exact same conditions, when there was sun-like light the degree of myopia was less.

https://www.dw.com/en/in-good-shape-smartphone-addiction/av-46202471 (https://www.dw.com/en/in-good-shape-smartphone-addiction/av-46202471)

In the above video it is also mentioned about the short distance vision (for example using smart phones as a child) and this causing myopia.

So when seeing far when outdoors (like Jake regularly suggests) we are doing good for our myopia but when there is also sun outdoors the results must be better.

I started sunning again and my vision the following days I do sunning is sharper.
http://forum.gettingstronger.org/index.php/topic,1147.msg8903.html#msg8903 (http://forum.gettingstronger.org/index.php/topic,1147.msg8903.html#msg8903)
Title: Re: Lack of sunlight causes myopia?
Post by: sleepmaster4 on August 05, 2019, 02:52:19 PM
I think darkness naturally causes people to strain to see more without realizing it.