Author Topic: Sugardude's Diet Puzzle  (Read 59516 times)

Offline Todd Becker

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Re: Sugardude's Diet Puzzle
« Reply #180 on: November 20, 2013, 07:27:00 PM »
Can you say more about

- why you thought the amino acids failed
- the details of your hypnotherapy?


Offline SUGARDUDE

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Re: Sugardude's Diet Puzzle
« Reply #181 on: November 20, 2013, 07:55:05 PM »
Todd, I truly have no clue why after 28 or so days without an issue, I was unable to string together another 7 days.  My best guess is that, just like everything else, my body or brain adjusted.

The hypnotherapy was suggested by my doctor awhile back.  After this last feeding frenzy, I felt I had run out of strategies.  Initially I spent about 30 minutes with the therapist going into great detail about my struggles with sugar binging.  I was then placed on a bed like apparatus and a blanket was placed over my body.  The therapist dimmed the lights and there was soothing spa type music in the background.  The therapist then proceeded to do her thing which involves imagery and self awareness of your body, typical hypnosis stuff.  During the next 30-45 minutes, she made suggestions on how I would treat sugar.  During this time I drifted in and out of consciousness.

When it was over, she told me that I may have listened or not.  Either way, she said it didn't matter.

So far she is right.  I have been able to control my urges so far.   

I'm still not convinced this is going to last, but she said I didn't need to return.

Offline SUGARDUDE

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Re: Sugardude's Diet Puzzle
« Reply #182 on: March 15, 2014, 08:12:15 PM »
Well the hypnosis effect was short lived, but I'm doing very well now.  One of the biggest obstacles I have faced over these years was fighting back the nighttime sugar cravings.  However, one simple dietary change seems to have eliminated the problem. 

All I did was skip to salt free seasoning with my evening meal.  Ever since I made that change, I have had no struggle whatsoever with after dinner sweet cravings.

I did go back to using some aminos in the morning, but I'm certain my recent success has everything to do with cutting back the salt.  I haven't even completely cut out sugar as I drink a couple cups of sweetened almond milk per day.  I have cut out candy, cookies, and other sweet treats for the last 13 days.




Offline Todd Becker

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Re: Sugardude's Diet Puzzle
« Reply #183 on: March 23, 2014, 05:56:50 PM »
Sugardude,

What non-sweet foods do you really enjoy?  Perhaps focusing on what you can enjoy, with variety and gusto, is more productive than worrying about what you are trying to avoid.  Some say that sugar cravings are significantly reduced if you are getting a full and balanced range of the nutrients you really need and may be deficient in.

Todd

Offline Tom

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Re: Sugardude's Diet Puzzle
« Reply #184 on: March 26, 2014, 08:56:07 PM »
I was recently informed about a book by Yoni Freedhoff called "The Diet Fix: Why Diets Fail and How to Make Yours Work." I didn't read the book, but it seems that it includes some refreshing ideas that you people can exploit:

1) Most diets fail, because they involve an element of suffering, and as such are not really realistic. It's possible to lose weight, while enjoying a bit of chocolate (Freedhoff actually prescribes chocolate to patients with lots of craving). It's not either eat it or don't eat it - the key is consistency, with a little bit of effort at a time.

2) The book seems to focus on tricks about good habit forming (e.g., how to avoid habits that lead to weight gain, how to avoid turning craving into binges), instead of the "follow-this-diet" approach.

3) In a radio interview to CBC the Current, Freedhoff talked about Canada's Food Guide being actually harmful because:

  • It makes no distinction between fruit juice and fruit. The former is a sugary drink, the latter is not. It doesn't make sense to me why would we pay more to get less healthy. Freedhoff mentioned that Australia's Food Guide does make that distinction clear.
  • It recommends minimum intake of foods of different categories. Freedhoff claims that this can lead to an overconsumption of calorie (that's not to say weight control is only about consuming less calorie and exercise more, but calorie does play a role)
  • It does not explicitly mention the elimination of trans fat.
  • Food industry professionals were consulted in the preparation of the Food Guide. Some of them sat in the Advisory Board. Freedhoff made an emphasis that Canada's Food Guide is not a "social service" - It's a way to promote the economic stability of food industry.

He then claimed that instead of following Northamerican food guides, we should look at Brazil's food guide, which encourages cooking from fresh produces, avoiding food industry and processed food. Ironic isn't it. 8)

4) Another emphasis is on fostering a healthy food  environment that creates good habits. Surrounds yourself with treats and the craving might just keep going.

5) Not sure about this. He might have talked about using protein intermittently to control craving. Some people forego of all "forbidden" food, only to find themselves eating non-stop afterwards.

6) Our culture promotes weight loss and condemns weight gain. Freedhoff explained that everyone is different and that neither bathroom scale or body mass index can accurate represent one's condition of health. He also talked about everyone having their own ideal personal weight, which is not necessarily the one promoted by our media or doctors.

I hope it's helpful. Here's a link:
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17737058-the-diet-fix

« Last Edit: March 31, 2014, 08:58:14 AM by TomLu »
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Offline SUGARDUDE

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Re: Sugardude's Diet Puzzle
« Reply #185 on: March 23, 2016, 08:47:57 PM »
Well it appears I've  finally figured this out.  No gimmicks.  No struggling with night time cravings.  No feeling of deprivation.

The solution involved a psychological component and a dietary component.

The dietary change was quite simple.  I added MORE carbs to my diet.  Of course these would be complex carbs such as Steel Cut Oats and vegetables.  I eat a very healthy portion of veggies with dinner.  My cravings have disappeared.

Psychologically, I treat sweet treats as a taboo as a drug addict treats cocaine.  I refer to people who offer me sweet treats lovingly as crack dealers.  Knowing that sugar has a similar, but even more pronounced effect on the brain as cocaine, made me realize that I had to approach it the same way as drug recovery.

But the key was the dietary change.  By simply making sure I get sufficient carbs in my diet, the night time cravings which always sabotaged my efforts, have magically disappeared.

I've been eating like this for 30 days and it has been amazingly easy.

Offline EugeneS

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Re: Sugardude's Diet Puzzle
« Reply #186 on: March 24, 2016, 05:00:44 AM »
Hello,
As a trainer I have found that a great way to start loosing a "bad" habit is exercise. I teach martial arts, and have found that all my students started cleaning up their bad habits. As for smokers, they found their bodies rejected the cigarettes as it impaired their training.
As for "bad"foods, as others have mentioned here, don't totally eliminated them if you find it hard to. I found the best method is to allow oneself a "treat" 1x week, such as the weekend; but not binge eating. Make it a reward for the hard training one did during the week.
I find if one completely eliminates these foods, they end up failing and go back to were they started.
Just like any addiction, keeping active with something that you enjoy, be around people that support and motivate you could be a solution.
Thanks!

Offline SUGARDUDE

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Re: Sugardude's Diet Puzzle
« Reply #187 on: March 24, 2016, 08:41:09 PM »
Like any addiction, you need to abstain as much as possible.  I do allow myself a sweet sensation a few times a day in the form of my protein shakes and oatmeal sweetened with Stevia.  Eventually I will add fruit back into my diet.  But ice cream, cookies, cake, cereal, candy......forget it.  It's just crack and it serves no good purpose. There is no such thing as moderation or a cheat day with someone who has an addictive brain like mine.

As for exercise, I completely agree.  If you are not producing serotonin or dopamine by eating junk, then you have to find other ways to get that pleasure.  Exercise is just one of many ways to do that.

Offline Todd Becker

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Re: Sugardude's Diet Puzzle
« Reply #188 on: March 27, 2016, 06:47:54 PM »
Sugardude!

So cool to have you back posting again. (And to have some posts on topics besides vision improvement  :)  )

I think your finding does make sense.  Vegetables and steel cut oats are both excellent sources of soluble fiber.  I used to not understand the big deal about fiber.  The explanation was always that it provides satiety by "slowing" gastric emptying, digestion, and rise in blood sugar.  That didn't make convincing sense to me.

The new explanation of the past decade its that fiber is a prebiotic that literally "feeds" the beneficial microbes in your intestines - your gut microbiome.  And these beneficial microbes (the bactericides species like bifidobacteria and lactobacilli) are not only more health promoting (e.g. reducing inflammation, obesity, etc), but they actively communicate with your brain, specifically your hypothalamus, to regulate hunger!  If you eat a lot of sugar and industrial oils, you grow a different type of bacteria in your gut, generally of the "bad" firmicutes type.  And the firmicutes not only cause inflammation, but they LOVE sugar and drive sugar cravings.  They directly mess with your mind!

By contrast, eating your vegetables and high fiber carbs feed the good "bactericides" bacteria, that don't particularly like sugar.

The microbiome in your gut is sometimes called "the second brain".  Here's a good layman's overview of how the second brain works:

https://theconversation.com/how-the-bacteria-in-our-gut-affect-our-cravings-for-food-33141

Look forward to hearing how your new diet works for you.

Todd



Offline SUGARDUDE

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Re: Sugardude's Diet Puzzle
« Reply #189 on: April 09, 2016, 07:34:21 AM »
Hey Todd,

Great information.  I had tried looking into treating the gut before with acidophilus and probiotics, but nothing really came of it.  So who knew that it would come back into play?  Clearly not me.

Things are going great.  Significantly, after going on vacation with my family and pretty much letting myself go for the week, I was able to come back and start right where I left off with no problem whatsoever.  This is a first for me because usually when I fall off, it takes several weeks.....or months to get back on.  The 5 pounds that I gained I lost back in less than a week.

I'm currently down 15.8 pounds from when I started on February 24.  I have been generally losing 2-3 pounds per week. 


Offline EugeneS

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Re: Sugardude's Diet Puzzle
« Reply #190 on: April 09, 2016, 07:38:50 AM »
SUGARDUDE,

Good to hear things are improving with you! :)