Author Topic: Hocus Focus  (Read 8134 times)

Offline NickGrouwen

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Re: Hocus Focus
« Reply #30 on: September 06, 2014, 10:20:44 AM »
@NickGrouwen
Thanks for the answer. A first managed active focus when I was about 20/40 so maybe I don't have much blur to dissolve now.
I believe that it doesn't matter what level your vision is at, you can always improve your vision by focusing on distant blurry objects. I have noticed that many people who say they've hit a plateau don't seem to push themselves as hard as they did in the beginning. My point is, it doesn't matter if you have 20/200, 20/40, 20/20 or 20/10 vision. At all levels of visual acuity make sure you that whatever object your practicing with is very blurry! Then once it clears up, move on to an ever more distant object.
Make sure you also preserve your near vision though, by practicing switching between near and far objects as quickly as you can - apparently a common baseball vision drill.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2014, 10:22:35 AM by NickGrouwen »

Offline NickGrouwen

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Re: Hocus Focus
« Reply #31 on: September 07, 2014, 01:17:14 PM »
Ok, this is going to be long post. My sincerest apologies for this, I hate this about myself. I'm going to update and condense my exercise description, actually I'll just completely re-write it, to maximize the original exercise's effectiveness and efficiency, consistent with my observations and experimentation and experience with Dr. Bates' concept of central fixation, and to simplify this pretty boring but dead simple and lightning fast process of improving your eyesight (in the case of nearsightedness - in the case of farsightedness, just focus on an  very blurry object close to you and bring it closer as you improve), as much as I can. I believe I've already read about a similar exercise on some other site years ago, so I take zero credit, but I can't remember which site it was...anyways here it is:

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HOCUS FOCUS
In my opinoin, hands down the (most boring, yes, but) ultimate, simplest, fastest vision improvement exercise there is, after four years of doing out many different vision/eye exercises.

Note: this exercise can be done with any object of your choice really and I would actually recommend that you focus on a different object at least once every other day,, but I believe a black dot on a white background is the most effective for this, since it is easier to focus on one single dot with nothing around it, than it is to focus on one letter in a row of letters on a Snellen chart, for example, in which case your focus and concentration might falter because of the other letters around the letter you're focusing on. If you are farsighted, focus not on a distant but a very blurry nearby object and bring it closer and closer to you as you improve, but also be sure to focus on far objects as well for a while since you absolutely don't want to lose your far vision.

1 Take a sheet of paper and a black permanent marker. Make a small dot in the middle of the sheet about 2 or 3 mm in size, though you can make it slightly bigger if you prefer it so. Tape the sheet to a wall in a dimly-to-decently-lit room (never a really bright room) or hallway that allows you to stand far away from it, so that the dot will be extremely blurry and very hard to make out.
2 Focus and concentrate with all your mental resources on the blurry dot and nothing but the dot. Try your hardest to see it clear. You'll eventually see it clear and evern experience colorful visual sensations in your field of vision as you do this. Do not worry if you failed to see the dot clearly in yyour first (ferw) practice session(s). You will still have made absolute progress and will see it clearly eventually. Your far focusing ability is improving at a rapid pace.
3 Always make sure that at the start of every single practice sessions, the dot is ectremely blurry. This means moving further and further away from it as your vision improves. You can measure your progress with a Snellen chart - but for this exercise, just make sure that the dot is always extremely blurry when you start your practice session. Also, patch your stronger eye from time to time to train your weaker eye alone. You DO NOT have to use a dot. You can use any object and I would actually recommend you use different objects everyday, I do the same thing. I used a dot here to really just illustrate that you should be focusing on as small as possible area on/of an object.
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That's really all I can say. It's really that simple. I know you want details, jimboston, but I have to apologize as there really is not a mechanical process that I go through when focusing on the dot. I just focus on the dot and try to see it clear. I don't even call it "blur clearing"anymore, since I don't try to clear the blur, more specifically I just try to see the dot clear. It is impossible for me to put into words what I do here as it is so random and a very individual and abstract process - that goes for everyone.
I do whatever I feel like doing, I do many different things like imagining the dot clear in my mind so it appears clear on paper after a while, or I try to keep my eyes open for as long as possible without blinking and while focusing on the dot, or I mentally try to zoom in on the dot, or I just stare at it without really doing anything, my mind drifts, etc... Whatever it is you do, it does not seem to matter much. I don't follow a specific mechanical process, I just let go and do random things and I see my eyesight improve every single day, permanently, so I'm content with the exercise as it is amd I'm not really looking for a very specific way focusing. Just focus, that's it. The keyword is focus - how I go about doing it, matters not to me. I don't do anything special with my eyelids, I don't blink a certain way, nothing. I just focus on the dot and I mentally try to see it clear. You will notice colorful visual sensations as you do this.

One important, but obvious and pretty much automatic thing anyways, is to NEVER keep your eyes still. They must always be moving otherwise you might burn an image, especially a black-on-white dot, especially when it is sharp and clear, especially in a bright environment, onto your retina, especially when you're like me and you practice everyday for at least an hour.

There really are no words for me to describe how you go about this - this process is different for every individual. I've really tried hard to find a way to describe what I do during focusing, but my and my friends' conclusion is that IT DOES NOT MATTER how you do it. You'll do your things and find your own ways of trying to see the object clearly. This focusing process is a VERY individual process. When me and my friends started out doing this, we had no idea what to do. Now we do. And guess what? We all do it i our own ways. We do many different things. We all focus in our own ways and we're all seeing better everyday and that's all that matter to us. It all comes naturally. I've never actually really read the blur clearing compendium thread. Do not worry about how you focus - just focus.

For at least an hour or as long as you can a day, simply focus on a very blurry distant object and try to see it clear < this sentence is ALL you need to worry about and is basically the whole exercise and the whole vision improvement shebang in a nutshell. This is in essence, all I've done from the very beginning and it feels like I'm trying to write a book around one simple principle. I would personally tell everyone to just forget about all the details - how to blink, how to clear the blur, how to move your eyes, exactly how to go about focusing, forget about all of it and just go in head first. I have just realized that I have now strayed so far away from the original plus lens therapy thing - wearing plus lenses while print pushing with a book/computer screen, with gradual intensity, for about 30 minutes a day.

I'm now at the point where I don't even worry about having to wear plus lenses behind the computer screen anymore, since no matter how much near work I do now, my vision improvements do not disappear anymore like they did in the beginning - they are permanent. I can focus near and far with no effort evem after prolonged near work where the text is just very slightly blurry. And everyday focusing on far objects becomes more effortless and quicker.

Incidentally, I believe it is better to focus on an object far away than on small, blurry letters on a screen close to you. I remember reading that there is a reason you HAVE to stand 20 feet away from a Snellen chart when measuring your visual acuity.  You can't really stand 10 feet away and the convert those readings to 20ft readings:
Quote
Very strictly, you can't. Someone modestly short-sighted would perform noticeably better on a 3m Snellen chart than a 6m one. The test distance can make a difference, and it's a piece of information worth preserving.
https://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080911073321AAGRfBJ
So I believe there is a difference in focusing on actual distant objects and focusing on small print close to you, and that doing the former is more efficient than the latter.
« Last Edit: September 07, 2014, 11:47:28 PM by NickGrouwen »