Author Topic: Tale of the Last True Hermit  (Read 1117 times)

Offline strongmama

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Tale of the Last True Hermit
« on: November 17, 2015, 05:41:48 AM »
I saw this article about a modern man who chose to be a hermit http://www.gq.com/story/the-last-true-hermit and was fascinated with many aspects of it including his vision health. He lived outside but hiding in a shady area, and he stole books to read. Reading with a minus lens, over time his eyesight deteriorated. The photo of him in jail at the top has his new glasses and they appear to be very strong minus.

Offline OtisBrown

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Re: Tale of the Last True Hermit
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2015, 04:22:24 PM »

Subject:  Bad vision at night - good vision during the day.

The ODs - always with the bad advice - just get a STRONGER prescription.  No one can help you.

http://www.mombu.com/medicine/human-head/t-bad-vision-at-the-end-of-the-day-and-w-light-changes-squint-eye-2703784.html

I'm having problems with my vision at the end of the day.

I'm a computer programmer, and spend a fair amount of time in front of the
computer when I'm not at work. I suspect that has something to do with my
problem. My vision is fairly clear most of the day, but from twilight on I
get distinctly more nearsighted, even indoors. Sometimes I will experience
blurry vision early in the day if I change my environment, for example I had
very blurred vision after walking into the library the other day.

If I squint, it helps bring things into focus, sometimes dramatically.

I've been to two eye doctors. One basically said "I don't know what's
wrong, try stronger glasses". The other suggested it was the near work I do
all day, causing my eyes to lock into near focus. He suggested some eye
exercises (which I have been doing) and also gave me a new prescription. I
had what seemed like an extensive run of tests with each doctor, and neither
of them found anything they considered alarming, but I'm still not soothed.

I am 33 years old. From what I have read, an increase in nearsightedness is
unusual for people my age. This worries me. Also, the fact that my vision
problems are much worse at night, and plausibly related to changes in the
light level, seems significant to me, but not to either of the eye doctors.

My main concern is that something is going on that will make my vision
continue to get worse, that would have been avoidable if I had known what to
do.

Has anyone here had similar experiences, or have any insight to offer beyond
what I've already been told?

Matt