Author Topic: Test Subject N=1 - Passed my Driver's Vision Test  (Read 8221 times)

Offline peterg

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Re: Test Subject N=1 - Passed my Driver's Vision Test
« Reply #15 on: March 04, 2013, 06:54:04 PM »

On Oct. 12, 2012 I went to get my driver's license renewed and with it I requested a new vision test.  I was measured with both eyes open at 20/30 and with that result I had the corrective lens restriction  removed from my driver’s license.

I started this process of learning about myopia prevention theories about a year ago, and haphazardly began to push print 10 months ago.  I was wearing a perscription of -2L/-2.5R, a perscription which had been stable for about 20 years.  I could barely see the big E (20/200) when I looked at a standard eye chart.


Peter, I just reread your initial post in this thread and now realize that you went from 20/200 or so to 20/30 in about a year. That's an amazing and inspiring accomplishment!

Thanks John.

I have stated on this forum that I believe from my experience and what I have read in other testimonials that  most myopes should be able to improve by .75D to 1.25D regardless where they start from.  It seems most people struggle to reduce after that initial .75D to 1.25D reduction.   I expect that you will find that corresponds with yourself as well once you start.  Bobby Matherne had almost an identical perscription as I did into his 60s before he tried, and he basically got to my level of improvement.  That is why Otis weighs so heavily on the 20/40 to 20/60 area where you should begin prevention.  I have interpreted that to be an assumption that a person is at most -1.5D at that point.  So an expected reduction should take the person's perscription to -.25D, -.5D, or -.75D depending on how much cilliary myopia they actually had.  At that point, the person will most likely have adequate accuity and be able to function without distance glasses at most times.

Offline PROH

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Re: Test Subject N=1 - Passed my Driver's Vision Test
« Reply #16 on: March 04, 2013, 09:47:39 PM »
Hi Peter


Will it be possible for you to share the visual acuity of you son with timeline , what you have recorded .
I want to know for how much time you are able to hold at current value of 20/40 or if he is improving / going down .  From where he has started .
I am finding difficulty with my daughter who is still too young to understand.

Also do you use minus for him outside for some time . Alex says it good to have minus outside close to 20/30 or so for active pulling.

Proh

Offline peterg

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Re: Test Subject N=1 - Passed my Driver's Vision Test
« Reply #17 on: March 05, 2013, 05:55:23 AM »
Hi Peter

Will it be possible for you to share the visual acuity of you son with timeline , what you have recorded .
I want to know for how much time you are able to hold at current value of 20/40 or if he is improving / going down .  From where he has started .
I am finding difficulty with my daughter who is still too young to understand.

Generally he has remained at 20/40 for 1 year since March 2012.  That is the first time I measured him with a snellon.  A note came home from school in Feb. 2011 that said he was 20/40 in both eyes.

I did a few months ago attempt to refract him on my own, and it was very difficult.  I believe he is -1.   Frauenfeld calculator puts him between -.75 and -1, depending on day and what value he tells me is the blur point.

Also do you use minus for him outside for some time . Alex says it good to have minus outside close to 20/30 or so for active pulling.

I asked in Alex's forum if he recommends me getting minus glasses for my son, given his protocol that you describe for pulling.  He suggested if he can get by without glasses, see at school, cross the street safely, etc., then we can avoid the minus.  So, we have not obtained him any minus lenses.

I do believe my son has less problems with double imaging or double vision at distance than I do.  That is the one divergence between his eyesight and my eyesight.  When he sees better on the snellon he doesn't see double vision.

Peter

Offline peterg

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Re: Test Subject N=1 - Passed my Driver's Vision Test
« Reply #18 on: March 05, 2013, 06:34:31 AM »
Let's assume your son is at -1.0, which means that his naked far point is at one meter, or 39 inches. His +1.0 reading glasses bring him to -2.0, which implies a far point of one half of a meter, or 19.5 inches. But he likes to read at 13 inches, which is one third of a meter, or 3 diopters. To bring his far point to one third of a meter he needs reading glasses that are 3 diopters greater than his refractive state of -1.0, i.e., +2.0. I suggest you have your son try +2.0 glasses and see how he feels reading at 13 inches.

So rather than trying to get your son to read at 19.5 inches with +1.00 glasses, let him read at 13 inches with +2.00 glasses.

The issue is with how close he moves his head when he puts on the glasses.  The stronger the lenses, the further he pulls his head towards what he is reading which cancels out the intended effect.  This then introduces the same ergonometric consequences which you are trying to avoid with your own laptop setup.   Furthermore, it may also train him into always reading this close even when he is not wearing plus lenses.

Offline johnlink

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Re: Test Subject N=1 - Passed my Driver's Vision Test
« Reply #19 on: March 05, 2013, 10:33:29 AM »
Let's assume your son is at -1.0, which means that his naked far point is at one meter, or 39 inches. His +1.0 reading glasses bring him to -2.0, which implies a far point of one half of a meter, or 19.5 inches. But he likes to read at 13 inches, which is one third of a meter, or 3 diopters. To bring his far point to one third of a meter he needs reading glasses that are 3 diopters greater than his refractive state of -1.0, i.e., +2.0. I suggest you have your son try +2.0 glasses and see how he feels reading at 13 inches.

So rather than trying to get your son to read at 19.5 inches with +1.00 glasses, let him read at 13 inches with +2.00 glasses.

The issue is with how close he moves his head when he puts on the glasses.  The stronger the lenses, the further he pulls his head towards what he is reading which cancels out the intended effect.  This then introduces the same ergonometric consequences which you are trying to avoid with your own laptop setup.   Furthermore, it may also train him into always reading this close even when he is not wearing plus lenses.

The stronger the plus lenses, the closer he should bring his reading material to his eyes in order to read at the far point, because stronger plus glasses bring his far point closer to him. Without plus lenses his far point is at 39 inches, a distance at which he is not able to hold a book, and at which he couldn't read small type even if he could hold the book out there. I see no problem for your son to read at 13 inches, provided he's wearing the appropriate plus glasses (i.e., +2.0). When giving him +1.0 glasses and asking him to read at 19.5 inches you are asking him to do two things that are non-habitual: 1) wear reading glasses, and 2) hold his book farther away than he'd like to. Earlier in this thread you wrote the following which suggests that 19.5 inches is farther away than he can comfortably manage:

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It is impossible for him to read/write at the edge of blur with +1 at school.  He would need stronger plus in order to be able to do that based on his body size.

You also wrote this:

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But he is fed up with my efforts, and doesn't want to do anything.

So how about telling him that you've been given an idea by a friend and you'd like him to try using +2.00 glasses while reading at 13 inches?. In that case you'd be asking him to do only one non-habitual thing: wear reading glasses. I think you might get him interested in improving his vision if he didn't feel your program was such an imposition.

Offline peterg

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Re: Test Subject N=1 - Passed my Driver's Vision Test
« Reply #20 on: March 05, 2013, 11:43:38 AM »
The stronger the plus lenses, the closer he should bring his reading material to his eyes in order to read at the far point, because stronger plus glasses bring his far point closer to him. Without plus lenses his far point is at 39 inches, a distance at which he is not able to hold a book, and at which he couldn't read small type even if he could hold the book out there. I see no problem for your son to read at 13 inches, provided he's wearing the appropriate plus glasses (i.e., +2.0). When giving him +1.0 glasses and asking him to read at 19.5 inches you are asking him to do two things that are non-habitual: 1) wear reading glasses, and 2) hold his book farther away than he'd like to. Earlier in this thread you wrote the following which suggests that 19.5 inches is farther away than he can comfortably manage:

Hi John, I think we are going around in circles here.  Feel free to send me an individual message on this forum, rather than continue this way. 

I have admitted earlier in this thread that I can't get him to wear stronger plus lenses to line up with the required mathematics because he finds them uncomfortable.   He refuses to wear them, and if I put those that would make 13 inches perfect and glued them to his face he would pull up to 9 inches.  He ***barely*** accepts lighter plus lenses, and uses them only in a limited fashion (if that) at school.  At home, it is a constant cycle of my monitoring, scolding, nagging, etc.  It has not proven very effective.   He has even had his own wow moments of seeing a crystal clear snellon as a tangible reward, yet it does not motivate him.

I also have my own personal experience of the difficulty of trying to stay at my normal distance when I wear strong plus lenses within my edge of blur and at my comfortable ergonometric distance.  When I get focused into performing my job, I end up pulling in much closer than my ergonometric preference.  I end up negating the addition of the stronger plus unless I maintain super viligance.  So, I end up seeing the difficulty with my son in light of his age and interest, and my personal experience.  Reading just inside the edge of blur, takes a very strong discipline, and if you are focused on work or anything else I am not sure how successful a person can be even if they have set it up to be at their prefered and natural ergonometric distance. 

So how about telling him that you've been given an idea by a friend and you'd like him to try using +2.00 glasses while reading at 13 inches?. In that case you'd be asking him to do only one non-habitual thing: wear reading glasses. I think you might get him interested in improving his vision if he didn't feel your program was such an imposition.

I know you are trying to help.  Once you make your effort to read at just inside the edge of blur or right at beginning of blur at your ideal distance of 22-23 inches, I think you will better understand the challenge involved for a young child to follow that protocol.  I have gone through the sleepless nights of worry of how to get there.

Peter

Offline johnlink

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Re: Test Subject N=1 - Passed my Driver's Vision Test
« Reply #21 on: March 05, 2013, 12:19:46 PM »
The stronger the plus lenses, the closer he should bring his reading material to his eyes in order to read at the far point, because stronger plus glasses bring his far point closer to him. Without plus lenses his far point is at 39 inches, a distance at which he is not able to hold a book, and at which he couldn't read small type even if he could hold the book out there. I see no problem for your son to read at 13 inches, provided he's wearing the appropriate plus glasses (i.e., +2.0). When giving him +1.0 glasses and asking him to read at 19.5 inches you are asking him to do two things that are non-habitual: 1) wear reading glasses, and 2) hold his book farther away than he'd like to. Earlier in this thread you wrote the following which suggests that 19.5 inches is farther away than he can comfortably manage:

Hi John, I think we are going around in circles here.  Feel free to send me an individual message on this forum, rather than continue this way.  

I have admitted earlier in this thread that I can't get him to wear stronger plus lenses to line up with the required mathematics because he finds them uncomfortable.   He refuses to wear them, and if I put those that would make 13 inches perfect and glued them to his face he would pull up to 9 inches.  He ***barely*** accepts lighter plus lenses, and uses them only in a limited fashion (if that) at school.  At home, it is a constant cycle of my monitoring, scolding, nagging, etc.  It has not proven very effective.   He has even had his own wow moments of seeing a crystal clear snellon as a tangible reward, yet it does not motivate him.

I also have my own personal experience of the difficulty of trying to stay at my normal distance when I wear strong plus lenses within my edge of blur and at my comfortable ergonometric distance.  When I get focused into performing my job, I end up pulling in much closer than my ergonometric preference.  I end up negating the addition of the stronger plus unless I maintain super viligance.  So, I end up seeing the difficulty with my son in light of his age and interest, and my personal experience.  Reading just inside the edge of blur, takes a very strong discipline, and if you are focused on work or anything else I am not sure how successful a person can be even if they have set it up to be at their prefered and natural ergonometric distance.  

So how about telling him that you've been given an idea by a friend and you'd like him to try using +2.00 glasses while reading at 13 inches?. In that case you'd be asking him to do only one non-habitual thing: wear reading glasses. I think you might get him interested in improving his vision if he didn't feel your program was such an imposition.

I know you are trying to help.  Once you make your effort to read at just inside the edge of blur or right at beginning of blur at your ideal distance of 22-23 inches, I think you will better understand the challenge involved for a young child to follow that protocol.  I have gone through the sleepless nights of worry of how to get there.

Peter


Now I understand! I had missed the critical piece of information that your son tends to read well inside his far point regardless of the power of the glasses. Do you have any idea why that would be? Do you have any idea why you find it difficult to read at your far point? I will let you know how it is for me when my +1.75 glasses arrive in about a week and I use them over my contacts. I'm very curious about this and will go to a drugstore and try it today.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2013, 12:51:35 PM by johnlink »

Offline peterg

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Re: Test Subject N=1 - Passed my Driver's Vision Test
« Reply #22 on: March 05, 2013, 08:01:10 PM »
Now I understand! I had missed the critical piece of information that your son tends to read well inside his far point regardless of the power of the glasses. Do you have any idea why that would be? Do you have any idea why you find it difficult to read at your far point? I will let you know how it is for me when my +1.75 glasses arrive in about a week and I use them over my contacts. I'm very curious about this and will go to a drugstore and try it today.

I am not sure why it happens, but I find myself pulling well inside the far point when I am focused on my job responsibilities.  It feels more comfortable reading there.  It was the same thing when I started naked eye when I was 13-14 inches from the screen.  I would find myself struggling to hold it there and move in close.  When work got stressful, especially those first days I had no choice but to put on my distance specs and move back to a normal distance.  So I am assuming that being young, and with the lack of self-motivation of a child, he just naturally pulls in closer.

Offline johnlink

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Re: Test Subject N=1 - Passed my Driver's Vision Test
« Reply #23 on: March 20, 2013, 06:21:03 AM »

I am not sure why it happens, but I find myself pulling well inside the far point when I am focused on my job responsibilities.  It feels more comfortable reading there.  It was the same thing when I started naked eye when I was 13-14 inches from the screen.  I would find myself struggling to hold it there and move in close.  When work got stressful, especially those first days I had no choice but to put on my distance specs and move back to a normal distance.  So I am assuming that being young, and with the lack of self-motivation of a child, he just naturally pulls in closer.


Peter, I've been giving your statement a lot of thought. My own experience using my new +1.75 glasses over my contacts does not include any tendency toward viewing inside the far point. I find it quite easy to sit upright and not lean in to my monitor.

I have some ideas about how to improve your ease reading at the far point that I'd like to introduce with two questions:

1) When you close your eyes in preparation for going to sleep, at what distance are you focusing and converging?

2) When you take a walk outside, what is the distribution of the range of distances over which you look? I.e., do you vary your gaze between close and far away, or do you tend to fix your gaze at some distance?

Offline peterg

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Re: Test Subject N=1 - Passed my Driver's Vision Test
« Reply #24 on: March 21, 2013, 07:20:17 PM »

I am not sure why it happens, but I find myself pulling well inside the far point when I am focused on my job responsibilities.  It feels more comfortable reading there.  It was the same thing when I started naked eye when I was 13-14 inches from the screen.  I would find myself struggling to hold it there and move in close.  When work got stressful, especially those first days I had no choice but to put on my distance specs and move back to a normal distance.  So I am assuming that being young, and with the lack of self-motivation of a child, he just naturally pulls in closer.


Peter, I've been giving your statement a lot of thought. My own experience using my new +1.75 glasses over my contacts does not include any tendency toward viewing inside the far point. I find it quite easy to sit upright and not lean in to my monitor.

I have some ideas about how to improve your ease reading at the far point that I'd like to introduce with two questions:

1) When you close your eyes in preparation for going to sleep, at what distance are you focusing and converging?

Can you clarify this question as it is confusing.  When I go turn off the lights, I walk to bed, pull the sheets, and then I think close my eyes. I am not focusing on anything really.

2) When you take a walk outside, what is the distribution of the range of distances over which you look? I.e., do you vary your gaze between close and far away, or do you tend to fix your gaze at some distance?

Until I started my rehabilitation, I must admit I looked down towards the ground as opposed to directly outward.  But now I try to look forward, and I believe I am successful most of the time.  When I catch myself daydreaming on my walks I see that I am really not staring off that far into the distance but rather maybe only 30-40 feet ahead of me.    When I am doing it purposefully, I vary my distance where I am trying to gaze.  I tried to ask my perfect vision wife when she is just staring obliviously into the distance at basically nothing, how far is she really looking and I believe her gaze is directed further away.

I am glad you don't have the problems with distance to your screen.  But if you recall, I stated that as long as I don't get focused into my work, i.e. when the work demand requires my attention, it is at this point that I pull in naturally from just inside the edge.  Dr. Frauenfeld says part of the reason people have this problem is that are brains are not meant to multi-task.  And that certainly seems to be the case with me.  If I am web surfing for pleasure, reading articles, but without any work stress, I am able to consciously keep my distance at the proper length.  It is just when I have to go about my work tasks in a focused fashion, that I am unsuccessful at holding the distance.  WIth my son, he uses the computer, plays video games, reads completely for pleasure.  He gets right into it.  At that point, if I am not monitoring it, he will draw closer and closer to a closer reading distance.

Offline johnlink

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Re: Test Subject N=1 - Passed my Driver's Vision Test
« Reply #25 on: March 22, 2013, 05:31:09 AM »

I am not sure why it happens, but I find myself pulling well inside the far point when I am focused on my job responsibilities.  It feels more comfortable reading there.  It was the same thing when I started naked eye when I was 13-14 inches from the screen.  I would find myself struggling to hold it there and move in close.  When work got stressful, especially those first days I had no choice but to put on my distance specs and move back to a normal distance.  So I am assuming that being young, and with the lack of self-motivation of a child, he just naturally pulls in closer.


Peter, I've been giving your statement a lot of thought. My own experience using my new +1.75 glasses over my contacts does not include any tendency toward viewing inside the far point. I find it quite easy to sit upright and not lean in to my monitor.

I have some ideas about how to improve your ease reading at the far point that I'd like to introduce with two questions:

1) When you close your eyes in preparation for going to sleep, at what distance are you focusing and converging?

Can you clarify this question as it is confusing.  When I go turn off the lights, I walk to bed, pull the sheets, and then I think close my eyes. I am not focusing on anything really.


Even if we're not intentionally converging and focusing at any particular distance, our eyes are directed somewhere (under the control of the external muscles of the eyes), and our lenses are set to some thickness (under the control of the ciliary muscles) which implies a focal distance. So my question asks where that distance is. A week or so ago while starting to take a nap I noticed that I was converging and focusing about 8 inches in front of me, and that seemed peculiar. Why was I doing all this work when all I wanted to do was take a nap? So with my eyes closed I alternated between directing my gaze right in front of me and then to the ceiling above me. Eventually I could allow my gaze to be relaxed, converging and focusing far away, maybe even to infinity. Since then I find that I can allow that to happen more and more easily.

Quote
2) When you take a walk outside, what is the distribution of the range of distances over which you look? I.e., do you vary your gaze between close and far away, or do you tend to fix your gaze at some distance?

Until I started my rehabilitation, I must admit I looked down towards the ground as opposed to directly outward.  But now I try to look forward, and I believe I am successful most of the time.  When I catch myself daydreaming on my walks I see that I am really not staring off that far into the distance but rather maybe only 30-40 feet ahead of me.    When I am doing it purposefully, I vary my distance where I am trying to gaze.  I tried to ask my perfect vision wife when she is just staring obliviously into the distance at basically nothing, how far is she really looking and I believe her gaze is directed further away.

For years I have made a practice of keeping my eyes mostly on the horizon when I walk, but I recently noticed on a bike ride along the Hudson River that it was not so easy to keep my gaze very far out. The George Washington Bridge is visible starting from about 70th Street, a distance of about 5 miles. So I've started a practice of looking across to New Jersey (about a mile) and scanning the shore all the way up to the GW Bridge, of course also keeping track of the bike path and all the other people and animals on it. I think the practice has made it easier for me to vary my gaze between near and far, and to keep the average distance of my gaze greater than it had been. Maybe it has also helped me to work on my computer at the far point with either my naked eyes or my +1.75 glasses over my contacts.

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I am glad you don't have the problems with distance to your screen.  But if you recall, I stated that as long as I don't get focused into my work, i.e. when the work demand requires my attention, it is at this point that I pull in naturally from just inside the edge.  Dr. Frauenfeld says part of the reason people have this problem is that are brains are not meant to multi-task.  And that certainly seems to be the case with me.  If I am web surfing for pleasure, reading articles, but without any work stress, I am able to consciously keep my distance at the proper length.  It is just when I have to go about my work tasks in a focused fashion, that I am unsuccessful at holding the distance.

This is very interesting. How can we learn to work purposefully without becoming over-attached to what we are doing? That has implications that include our eyes and go beyond them.

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WIth my son, he uses the computer, plays video games, reads completely for pleasure.  He gets right into it.  At that point, if I am not monitoring it, he will draw closer and closer to a closer reading distance.

Maybe he learned that from you, and maybe he could learn from you how to go about his activities in an easier way. Or maybe he could show you how to do it.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2013, 10:04:29 AM by johnlink »

Offline peterg

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Re: Test Subject N=1 - Passed my Driver's Vision Test
« Reply #26 on: March 24, 2013, 06:48:09 PM »
Even if we're not intentionally converging and focusing at any particular distance, our eyes are directed somewhere (under the control of the external muscles of the eyes), and our lenses are set to some thickness (under the control of the ciliary muscles) which implies a focal distance. So my question asks where that distance is. A week or so ago while starting to take a nap I noticed that I was converging and focusing about 8 inches in front of me, and that seemed peculiar. Why was I doing all this work when all I wanted to do was take a nap? So with my eyes closed I alternated between directing my gaze right in front of me and then to the ceiling above me. Eventually I could allow my gaze to be relaxed, converging and focusing far away, maybe even to infinity. Since then I find that I can allow that to happen more and more easily.

OK, now I got you.  I would have to state that my natural distance is very close.  Certainly I don't even think across the room.  Yesterday I was driving with my wife, and once again asked her where are her eyes fixating.  And she was stating that they were looking way, way furhter than I was.   While I was looking at 40 feet or so, she was looking hundreds of feet further well past the intersection.     I think my before eyes close for the night my fixation is probably around 1.5-3 feet.

For years I have made a practice of keeping my eyes mostly on the horizon when I walk, but I recently noticed on a bike ride along the Hudson River that it was not so easy to keep my gaze very far out.

Yes, I would say I struggle with this issue, even today after all my efforts.

Maybe he learned that from you, and maybe he could learn from you how to go about his activities in an easier way. Or maybe he could show you how to do it.

My son has quite possibly learned his vision habits from me.  It is very frustrating.  I have tried everything to improve.  I definately know he switched from interest in looking into the horizon for a lot of things.  For example, as a 4 or 5 year old he started paying attention to highway exit numbers, and our ride home.  He knew where we were going.  Then it seems electronics took over.  Now, he notices nothing about streets, and only if we force him to look does he ever remotely try.  He prefers to look at things he brought into the car, most dearly any sort of electronics which we try to restrict, and causes irritation on his part.

It is interesting to know, my wife always paid attention in the car growing up.  She had this phobia as a child worrying about being left somewhere and not knowing her way back home.  So she always paid attention.  Certainly my son's perceptiveness was quite impressive early in his preschool days about thinking where we were going while in the car.  Not the case anymore.

I have almost felt I should put him in a booster seat in the front seat now, and turn off the passenger air bag just so he has an unobstructed view of where we are going and can be convinced to use his eyes again for distance....

Offline johnlink

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Re: Test Subject N=1 - Passed my Driver's Vision Test
« Reply #27 on: March 24, 2013, 07:08:51 PM »
Even if we're not intentionally converging and focusing at any particular distance, our eyes are directed somewhere (under the control of the external muscles of the eyes), and our lenses are set to some thickness (under the control of the ciliary muscles) which implies a focal distance. So my question asks where that distance is. A week or so ago while starting to take a nap I noticed that I was converging and focusing about 8 inches in front of me, and that seemed peculiar. Why was I doing all this work when all I wanted to do was take a nap? So with my eyes closed I alternated between directing my gaze right in front of me and then to the ceiling above me. Eventually I could allow my gaze to be relaxed, converging and focusing far away, maybe even to infinity. Since then I find that I can allow that to happen more and more easily.

OK, now I got you.  I would have to state that my natural distance is very close.  Certainly I don't even think across the room.  Yesterday I was driving with my wife, and once again asked her where are her eyes fixating.  And she was stating that they were looking way, way furhter than I was.   While I was looking at 40 feet or so, she was looking hundreds of feet further well past the intersection.     I think my before eyes close for the night my fixation is probably around 1.5-3 feet.

So play around with this when you're ready to go to sleep: Lying on your back with your eyes open, alternate a few times between looking at your nose and the ceiling. Then do the same thing with your eyes closed. After a little bit of that I bet you'll be able to increase your habitual distance.

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For years I have made a practice of keeping my eyes mostly on the horizon when I walk, but I recently noticed on a bike ride along the Hudson River that it was not so easy to keep my gaze very far out.

Yes, I would say I struggle with this issue, even today after all my efforts.

I suggest you give up all the struggle and effort and just play with looking near and far, and enjoying the amazing experience of stereo vision.

Quote
Maybe he learned that from you, and maybe he could learn from you how to go about his activities in an easier way. Or maybe he could show you how to do it.

My son has quite possibly learned his vision habits from me.  It is very frustrating.  I have tried everything to improve.  I definately know he switched from interest in looking into the horizon for a lot of things.  For example, as a 4 or 5 year old he started paying attention to highway exit numbers, and our ride home.  He knew where we were going.  Then it seems electronics took over.  Now, he notices nothing about streets, and only if we force him to look does he ever remotely try.  He prefers to look at things he brought into the car, most dearly any sort of electronics which we try to restrict, and causes irritation on his part.

It is interesting to know, my wife always paid attention in the car growing up.  She had this phobia as a child worrying about being left somewhere and not knowing her way back home.  So she always paid attention.  Certainly my son's perceptiveness was quite impressive early in his preschool days about thinking where we were going while in the car.  Not the case anymore.

I have almost felt I should put him in a booster seat in the front seat now, and turn off the passenger air bag just so he has an unobstructed view of where we are going and can be convinced to use his eyes again for distance....

Maybe find a place to take a walk together where you have an unobstructed view for a great distance, such as across a river. You and your son could make up games about what you can see very far away.