Author Topic: achieving 20/20 night-time vision?  (Read 8537 times)

Offline mailliam

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Re: achieving 20/20 night-time vision?
« Reply #15 on: February 22, 2014, 07:40:55 AM »
Are you fairly sure that doing so would be different than just using a stronger plus lens and reading under brighter light?

I think TomLu's thread answered one of my questions here.  Based on the research he found, it seems the best approach to improving vision -- including even night-time vision -- would be to read in bright sunlight using a challenging plus lens.  Reading in dim light, even with a plus lens, appears likely to be less effective.  Granted, most of this research was done with animals, but I imagine the overall principles are the same.

As a quick note, David De Angelis  (author of Secret of Perfect Vision) used a +6 in bright sunlight in the later stages of his myopia recovery.

Offline CapitalPrince

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Re: achieving 20/20 night-time vision?
« Reply #16 on: February 22, 2014, 08:04:23 AM »
David De Angelis in his book said he COULD read through a +6D under bright sunlight when his myopia was reduced significantly.
Obviously its up to the individual to decide what plus lenses to use. You shpuld try whatever method works for you.

It;s not the fact the that a "plus" will fix your eyesight, its that a plus lenses induces an "edge of blur" so you can print push and increase your focus point that way.

Offline OtisBrown

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Re: achieving 20/20 night-time vision?
« Reply #17 on: February 22, 2014, 08:13:22 AM »
Hi Sam,

You have most of this concept correctly.  As you know, I personally verify both my Snellen and refractive STATE.  I do this because no optometrist has any interest in myself, or my desire to protect *my* distant vision from the effect of long-term "near work" - that I continue to do because I enjoy it.

I think your intellectual ability - is critical to *you* protecting your distant vision - through four years of college.  No optometrist has ANY interest in you, or your desire to protect your distant vision through the college years.

The reason I asked you to check your, "best", vision THROUGH a -1/2 diopter - is so that you will know how "good" you can get your distant vision - yourself.  This is to confirm that your retina is, "perfect.  (I think the words, myopia, emmetropia, hyperopia) are very poor words to describe getting to goal of far-better than 20/20 vision. 

You know what is possible.  But it truly does take dedicated, persistent, wearing a plus, to get to a valuable positive status.

This is why I "standardize" on reading 1/2 the letters on the 20/20 line.  It is the LEGAL standard for First Class FAA pilots. But I would add that a pilot who is "just barely" at 20/20, would be wise to intensify his wearing of the plus, until he exceeds the 20/20 line.
 
But the truly, "tough part", is that it will take you six months of very consistent wearing of a +2.5 diopters - to finally "get there".  This is why no one can "prescribe" prevention.  It is difficult for most people to understand WHY they must make that type of commitment - or the consequences for their long-term vision - if the refuse to take plus-prevention seriously at 20/20.




Hi myoticm,

You probably don't believe me but if a person can ONLY read the 20/20 (no lines above lines above that) with abit of focusing/squinting that is actually fairly POOR vision. 20/10 (or whatever your max visual acuty is, but most max v/a is between 20/15-20/8) is not superhuman vision, it is "normal vision".

Almost everyone has a good enough retina to exceed the 20/20.

An OD "defines" refractive state as the lens needed to reach max visual acuity. People in this forum "define" refractive state as the lens needed to clear the 20/20 line.
A borderline 20/20 probably takes about a -0.5 to -1D to have PERFECT vision. But since it is 20/20, some people believe that it should be 0D or "emmetropia".

you decide if you want max visual acuity to mean hyperopic or emmetropic. As long as your vision "feels" comfortable none of this really matters.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2014, 08:38:30 AM by OtisBrown »

Offline Myoctim

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Re: achieving 20/20 night-time vision?
« Reply #18 on: February 24, 2014, 03:09:36 PM »

An OD "defines" refractive state as the lens needed to reach max visual acuity. People in this forum "define" refractive state as the lens needed to clear the 20/20 line.
A borderline 20/20 probably takes about a -0.5 to -1D to have PERFECT vision. But since it is 20/20, some people believe that it should be 0D or "emmetropia".


that make's sense. I thought you would add that -1D to the OD's  prescription.

Offline caimanjosh

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Re: achieving 20/20 night-time vision?
« Reply #19 on: February 25, 2014, 12:29:48 PM »
sunlight can greatly increase the depth of field. In sunlight my vision in 20/15 but in poor weather/lighting my vision is 20/25-20/30.
...
perfect vision "emmetropia" is actually reading the 20/20 through a +1D lens, this is 20/10+ vision (or whatever your max visual acuity is), and perfect night vision. I remember when i had that vision, before high school, life was good.
...
The frauenfeld claims that many people have been able to return to 20/10 vision. Theoretically its possible. Probably very very very few people were able to return their vision from 20/40 to perfect. but  you really have to "get busy" with the plus for years since the eyes go down very slowly.

Yes -- I think this is pretty much exactly where I am now.  On a bright day, I can just barely read most of the letters on the 20/15 line.  But in dim conditions, I still feel like my vision isn't quite up to snuff -- more like it's 20/30 or so.  So getting able to read a 20/10 line in bright conditions sounds like it might be an ideal goal.  I'll have to print out another Snellen for this, as 20/15 is the smallest on the one I'm using now.  But I doubt Id' have any chance to be there for some time yet anyways.  Happily, summer sunshine is coming and may help out in my efforts. 

Offline Myoctim

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Re: achieving 20/20 night-time vision?
« Reply #20 on: March 02, 2014, 04:07:05 AM »
,
...but most max v/a is between 20/15-20/8) is not superhuman vision, it is "normal vision".

My optometrist told me not everyone having that 20/10 retina.

Maybe it's because  the elongation of the eyball stretches the retina not only increasing the risk for retinal detachment but also lowering the cone density. (resulting in a lower optical resolution).

So the question is does rehab also reverses that decreased cone density?

Interesting, if we look at that "software for vision improvement" thread better than 10/15 doesn't seem to be so common but you can get it.


Offline CapitalPrince

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Re: achieving 20/20 night-time vision?
« Reply #21 on: March 02, 2014, 07:27:27 AM »
hmm good point there. I didn't realize the myopia can actually cause a lower max visual acuity, but it does seem likely when someone is like -10D, there max visual acuity may be 20/20 or even less. But in an emmetropic eye the max visual acuity is very high, always greatly exceed the 20/20 (also there is great depth perception and contrast)

Offline Blue Eyes

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Re: achieving 20/20 night-time vision?
« Reply #22 on: March 16, 2014, 06:14:00 AM »
Quote
My question is, has anyone managed to achieve nearly perfect dim lighting/night-time vision?  Is this possible? 

Several weeks ago I ended up walking in the night on a well lit road,  I took off my glasses and after a while of adjustment my eyes filled with tears but then I had a clear flash that I managed to maintain for most of my walk home.  My eyes were stinging afterwards but I was quite excited about my new discovery.    I have repeated these night vision walks a few times now and have repeated clear flashes. 

It seems easier to get clear night-time vision in the well light streets then in total darkness or even in daylight as there is less strain in the eyes possibly due to less light on the eyes.

-Mike
« Last Edit: March 16, 2014, 07:37:51 AM by Blue Eyes »

Offline OtisBrown

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Re: achieving 20/20 night-time vision?
« Reply #23 on: March 16, 2014, 07:17:26 AM »
Hi Blue Eyes,

I know that, "clear flash" is generic.  But I always recommend checking your vision on your own Snellen.  I see my vision vary between 20/20 and 20/15 (i.e., clear flash).

Otis


Quote
My question is, has anyone managed to achieve nearly perfect dim lighting/night-time vision?  Is this possible? 

Several weeks ago I ended up walking in the night on a well lit road,  I took off my glasses and after a while of adjustment my eyes filled with tears but then I had a clear flash that I managed to maintain for most of my walk home.  My eyes were stinging afterwards but I was quite excited about my new discovery.    I have repeated these night vision walks a few times now and have repeated clear flashes. 

It seems easier to get clear vision in the well light streets in the night then in daylight as there is less strain in the eyes possible due to less light.

-Mike

Offline CapitalPrince

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Re: achieving 20/20 night-time vision?
« Reply #24 on: March 16, 2014, 07:48:23 AM »
most people mistake clear flashes as progress, but its not so. clear flashes can be generated by

-producing tears in my eyes
-blinking forcibly (temporarily flattening the cornea)
-doing eye rotations (may temporarily change shape of eye)
-palming, closing eyes for a few seconds

none of these gives permanent results.
A normal eye with a positive refractive state of say +0.5D or more (to 20/20) should not experience these issues.