Author Topic: Pinhole glasses  (Read 8454 times)

Offline johnlink

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Pinhole glasses
« on: March 06, 2013, 07:04:01 AM »
I've never used pinhole glasses but I sometimes create a single pinhole with my right hand in order to read something I couldn't otherwise read, such as fine print on CD packaging. I wonder whether anyone here has used pinhole glasses, and if so, whether you found that they helped you to improve.

I also wonder whether it might be effective to gradually increase the size of the pinholes. If I slightly enlarge the single pinhole created by my hand a small amount of blur will be introduced, which I presume would be motivation for my brain to remove, just as reading just outside the blur point is, and just as having a slightly under-corrected pair of distance glasses or contacts is. So the strategy I see is to start with the pinholes as they are drilled by the manufacturer, which presumably gives a sharp image, and then to ever so slightly enlarge the holes so that there would be a just-noticeable blur. When a sharp image could be seen the pinholes would again be enlarged. If one were able to repeat the sequence many times eventually the holes would be quite large, the pinhole effect would be absent, and a large improvement in vision would have been made.

I'm buying a pair today!
« Last Edit: March 06, 2013, 07:36:16 AM by johnlink »

Offline Todd Becker

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Re: Pinhole glasses
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2013, 08:57:12 AM »
John,

Pinhole glasses reduce blur by a different principle than convex or concave lenses.  They dramatically increase the depth of field of focus, rather than shifting the focal plane.  The question then becomes whether the kind of reduction in defocus generated by pinhole glasses will act as an adequate stimulus to the eye to change its shape.  The neurology of the eye needs to pick up some indication of the direction in which it must change to bring the focal plane of the image into alignment with the sensory layer of the retina that detects focus.

I think your idea of gradually widening the pinhole might just work.  At a certain critical pinhole size, ordinary reading material would lie right at the outer edge (for myopes) of the depth of field.  Changes in the shape of the eye to shorten axial length would then extend this edge of the depth of field, and provide a positive stimulus to remodelling of the eye.

The ideal pinhole glasses would have adjustable center holes.  Short of that, you'd have to find a way to carefully drill out the holes to make them progressively larger as you improve.

It's a great experiment.  Let us know how it goes!

Todd

Offline johnlink

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Re: Pinhole glasses
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2013, 09:37:10 AM »
Pinhole glasses reduce blur by a different principle than convex or concave lenses.  They dramatically increase the depth of field of focus, rather than shifting the focal plane.  The question then becomes whether the kind of reduction in defocus generated by pinhole glasses will act as an adequate stimulus to the eye to change its shape.  The neurology of the eye needs to pick up some indication of the direction in which it must change to bring the focal plane of the image into alignment with the sensory layer of the retina that detects focus.

I think your idea of gradually widening the pinhole might just work.  At a certain critical pinhole size, ordinary reading material would lie right at the outer edge (for myopes) of the depth of field.  Changes in the shape of the eye to shorten axial length would then extend this edge of the depth of field, and provide a positive stimulus to remodelling of the eye.

Yup!

Quote
The ideal pinhole glasses would have adjustable center holes.  Short of that, you'd have to find a way to carefully drill out the holes to make them progressively larger as you improve.

I have a set of drill bits something like this: http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51G0THLeIQL._SL500_AA300_.jpg The increment of 1/64" will probably be small enough to create a just-noticeable difference in blur that the brain can then resolve.

Quote
It's a great experiment.  Let us know how it goes!

You can count on that!

Offline OtisBrown

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Re: Pinhole glasses
« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2013, 10:26:50 AM »
Hi John,

I have some "pin-hole" glasses.  In bright light - they work by increasing the "depth-of-field" by about 2 diopters.  Thus if you have your Snellen "up", and are reading the 20/100 line - you could probably read the 20/30 line THROUGH the pin-holes.  But the problem is that your DIRECTION of sight is limited to about +/- 30 degrees.  You could not wear them for active sports.  I wore them to see how they worked.  But I did not wear them beyond that point.  For me, if I measured my refractive STATE at -1.0 diopters - myself, to read the 20/20 line - I would just order the $10 minus lenses from Zenni and use them only for driving a car (I must always be legal).  But, I would depend on  my ability to wear the plus, until I began to substantially exceed the 20/40 line - so I could pass the DMV, and not be required to wear a minus for driving a car.  But even then, I would wear the plus - until I got very close to, and exceeded the 20/25 line.

Offline johnlink

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Re: Pinhole glasses
« Reply #4 on: March 06, 2013, 03:49:48 PM »

Offline johnlink

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Re: Pinhole glasses
« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2013, 08:31:01 PM »
The pinhole glasses arrived yesterday. While I can read my computer monitor with them over my otherwise naked eyes, it's rather unpleasant. The honeycomb makes reading difficult unless I move my head left to right, and it is difficult to find my cursor because it can hide behind the honeycomb. Perhaps they will be more pleasant to use for vision training while watching TV. We'll see.

Offline Todd Becker

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Re: Pinhole glasses
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2013, 10:02:07 PM »
I'll be interested to hear how they work for you.

Offline PhilippK

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Re: Pinhole glasses
« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2013, 05:25:01 AM »
You could also try to wear a plus underneath the pinholes, although that maybe too cumbersome.

Offline johnlink

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Re: Pinhole glasses
« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2013, 05:38:37 AM »
I'll be interested to hear how they work for you.

Because of all the honeycomb I do not at all like using the pinhole glasses for working on the computer or for other reading. I have not yet tried them for watching TV but I expect I won't like them for that use either, for the same reason. We'll see.

Offline johnlink

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Re: Pinhole glasses
« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2013, 05:39:51 AM »
You could also try to wear a plus underneath the pinholes, although that maybe too cumbersome.

Why do you suggest that? How do you think it might be useful?

Offline PhilippK

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Re: Pinhole glasses
« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2013, 05:48:29 AM »
Wearing the plus underneath would bring your far point in, thus challenging your eyes. I think it would be simpler than drilling holes wider.

Offline johnlink

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Re: Pinhole glasses
« Reply #11 on: March 18, 2013, 05:59:32 AM »
Wearing the plus underneath would bring your far point in, thus challenging your eyes. I think it would be simpler than drilling holes wider.

That makes sense, except then there seems to be no reason to use the pinhole glasses.

Offline PhilippK

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Re: Pinhole glasses
« Reply #12 on: March 18, 2013, 06:21:14 AM »
Wearing the plus underneath would bring your far point in, thus challenging your eyes. I think it would be simpler than drilling holes wider.

That makes sense, except then there seems to be no reason to use the pinhole glasses.

No if you use a light plus you should still be able to see clear enough through the pinholes.

Offline johnlink

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Re: Pinhole glasses
« Reply #13 on: March 18, 2013, 06:34:07 AM »
Wearing the plus underneath would bring your far point in, thus challenging your eyes. I think it would be simpler than drilling holes wider.

That makes sense, except then there seems to be no reason to use the pinhole glasses.

No if you use a light plus you should still be able to see clear enough through the pinholes.

My naked vision is about -3D myopic. With +1.75 glasses I become about -5D myopic. With pinhole glasses over the +1.75 glasses my monitor is in focus, but the set of two pairs of glasses is awkward and I no longer see the purpose of the pinholes.

Offline PhilippK

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Re: Pinhole glasses
« Reply #14 on: March 18, 2013, 08:40:02 AM »
Wearing the plus underneath would bring your far point in, thus challenging your eyes. I think it would be simpler than drilling holes wider.

That makes sense, except then there seems to be no reason to use the pinhole glasses.

No if you use a light plus you should still be able to see clear enough through the pinholes.



My naked vision is about -3D myopic. With +1.75 glasses I become about -5D myopic. With pinhole glasses over the +1.75 glasses my monitor is in focus, but the set of two pairs of glasses is awkward and I no longer see the purpose of the pinholes.

Well when your vision has improved that could be another way to add stimulus just like when you suggested to widen the holes. I agree that pinholes are distracting, I never bothered to wear my mine for any length of time.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2013, 08:46:52 AM by PhilippK »