Author Topic: strong monocular defocus  (Read 2472 times)

Offline FonkStreet

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strong monocular defocus
« on: July 14, 2013, 01:21:28 PM »
Hello to all.

To begin, thank to Otis Brown and Todd Becker for their huge involvement.

The scientific studies show us that the eyes can respond to strong defocus. The problem is: with strong defocus, you can't do anything due to the excessive blur.

Then, I wonder, why not to defocus only one eye at a time?

The brain will take the best image among the two eyes.

one eye: correctly corrected or under corrected for see clearly
other eye: strong myopic defocus

What do you think about that?

They have used this technique in this study:
http://www.iovs.org/content/51/12/6262.full

With only one hour of myopic defocus, a significant reduction in optical axial length (mean change, −13 ± 14 μm; P = 0.0001) was found.

Offline Todd Becker

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Re: strong monocular defocus
« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2013, 08:29:32 PM »
Thanks for posting the study.  It's excellent validation of the IRDT theory in humans. 

If your eyes have differences in their degree of myopia or hyperopia, it most definitely makes sense to treat each eye differently.  I sometimes wink, patch or diffuse the stronger eye to work on improving the weaker eye.

Offline mailliam

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Re: strong monocular defocus
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2013, 03:05:27 AM »
Thanks for posting the study.  It's excellent validation of the IRDT theory in humans. 

If your eyes have differences in their degree of myopia or hyperopia, it most definitely makes sense to treat each eye differently.  I sometimes wink, patch or diffuse the stronger eye to work on improving the weaker eye.

If both eyes are almost the same, do you think it would be useful to patch and work on each eye individually for equal amounts of time?

I read someone saying the eyes need to exert effort to fuse the images together because of the different focal point caused by the plus. By patching one eye and working them individually they wouldn't have to do this, which results in faster improvements supposedly.



Then, I wonder, why not to defocus only one eye at a time?

With only one hour of myopic defocus, a significant reduction in optical axial length (mean change, −13 ± 14 μm; P = 0.0001) was found.

Are you imagining plus glasses with one lens popped out so you can have one eye being stimulated by the plus lens prescription and the other eye free to continue working throughout the day, and then switching eyes?

Regarding the optcial axial length change, do you know if there was a noticeable change from the participants snellen readings/diopter prescription (if they were taken)?


Liam

Offline FonkStreet

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Re: strong monocular defocus
« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2013, 11:53:15 AM »
Thank you both for your answers.

Quote from: mailliam
Are you imagining plus glasses with one lens popped out so you can have one eye being stimulated by the plus lens prescription and the other eye free to continue working throughout the day, and then switching eyes?

one eye: normally corrected
the other eye: myopic defocus

Quote from: mailliam
Regarding the optcial axial length change, do you know if there was a noticeable change from the participants snellen readings/diopter prescription (if they were taken)?

not taken, but the mean change of axial lenght was -13 μm.

a 3D myopic eye is 1mm (1000 μm) longer than an emmetropic eye.

Offline mailliam

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Re: strong monocular defocus
« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2013, 02:41:30 AM »
Thank you both for your answers.

Quote from: mailliam
Are you imagining plus glasses with one lens popped out so you can have one eye being stimulated by the plus lens prescription and the other eye free to continue working throughout the day, and then switching eyes?

one eye: normally corrected
the other eye: myopic defocus

Quote from: mailliam
Regarding the optcial axial length change, do you know if there was a noticeable change from the participants snellen readings/diopter prescription (if they were taken)?

not taken, but the mean change of axial lenght was -13 μm.

a 3D myopic eye is 1mm (1000 μm) longer than an emmetropic eye.

Wow, with the 1000μm to compare those are really significant results. Where did you find that figure from? Is there a pattern to the axial length for myopes? (Would be interesting if we could see from the axial length when psuedomyopia ends and when axial myopia begins).

Wouldn't the corrected eye just dominate the vision? Wearing a +3 D lens  on the right eye would be like being myopic at -3.00 for the emmetropic participants, surely the left eye would just takeover and the right eye would 'give-up'?


-Liam


Offline Hillyman

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Re: strong monocular defocus
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2013, 07:07:12 AM »
This is interesting!  I posted a few days ago that I have the Superfocus glasses, and reading this post sparked the thought that I can take out the prescription lens on one eye (in the Superfocus glasses, there are two lenses for each eye: a prescription lens, attached by magnets; and the variable "plus lens" of the frame itself. My prescription is -5.50 for both eyes). This means that I can take off one lens and have a massive blur in one eye but the the other eye still has usable vision. In fact, with the eye that still has the prescription, I can even dial that down with the plus adjustment to be "working the blur."