Author Topic: Eyesight without glasses  (Read 402499 times)

Offline Todd Becker

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Re: Eyesight without glasses
« Reply #15 on: August 12, 2010, 02:13:09 PM »
I must have mistaken what i have said.  I meant reducing the myopia, but eliminating the astigmatism correction altogether.  ALso, i heard that astigmatism is caused by tilting of head, or reading at an angle where the eyeball must look to one side. (ie, putting a book to right of head and having to move eyeballs to look to the right).

Yes, I think that reducing the myopia prescription, and eliminating the astigmatism correction altogether is exactly the way to go.  That should help reverse both myopia and astigmatism at the same time.

From what I've read, astigmatism can be caused by a whole range of "bad habits".  Including tilting your head, keeping your head in a fixed position too long--whether straight ahead or angled, reading in poor light, overtaxing your eyes by reading too much without a break, etc.  A number of these points are address in the DeAngelis book, "The Secret of Perfect Vision".  He proposes a number of "exercises" to increase flexilibity and versatility.  The one I like best is looking straight ahead and holding your head fixed, then shifting your eyes to the eight extremes, the corners and edges of an imaginary box ahead of you: up, down, left, right, up/left, up/right, down/left and down/right.   At each of the eight points you try to focus on what you see.  This works best under well lighted conditions that help promote focusing.  By doing this periodically, you increase the strength and flexibility of the eye muscles -- kind of like going to the gym to do resistance exercises.   This exercise only takes a few minutes, you can do it once or twice a day, or to break up a long reading or computer session.

I think if you combine the weakened prescription with challenging your eyes to focus at the limit of their range -- with the above eye exercises of DeAngelis -- you have a winning combination for reducing astigmatism.

Offline skirrel

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Re: Eyesight without glasses
« Reply #16 on: August 17, 2010, 12:13:29 PM »
Do you think that food can affect eyesight negatively or positively?  ie i heard that high fructose corn syrup is bad for eyesight.

Offline Patrea

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Re: Eyesight without glasses
« Reply #17 on: August 24, 2010, 09:13:34 AM »
So please, have I got this right: I have myopia
R -3.00, L -1.50
So I should have slightly underpowered lens for long distance, say -2.00 and -1.00, and for computer work long sighted specs at say +1 - ?


Offline Todd Becker

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Re: Eyesight without glasses
« Reply #18 on: August 25, 2010, 06:51:45 PM »
Do you think that food can affect eyesight negatively or positively?  ie i heard that high fructose corn syrup is bad for eyesight.

skirrel,

Sorry for the delayed response -- I was travelling the past week.  

I do think that food can affect eyesight.  My experience is that all sugary foods and carbs --  I wouldn't single out HFCS -- can often have a negative affect on my ability to focus. I also found that high dose omega-3 (which I take as Twinlabs orange-flavored emulsified fish oil, either straight or in a glass of juice) is great for my eyes.  I only take it once or twice a week, and find that a few hours after a dose my eyesight sharpens and the reds, oranges and purples become especially intense.  Not sure why, but perhaps it affects the membranes in the rod and cone receptors in your eyes.

I gave up coffee a few years ago (except for an occasional decaf), but I did find that coffee gave me sharper vision -- not that I'd recommend it.

Are the plus lenses working out for you?

Todd

Offline Todd Becker

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Re: Eyesight without glasses
« Reply #19 on: August 25, 2010, 07:07:58 PM »
So please, have I got this right: I have myopia
R -3.00, L -1.50
So I should have slightly underpowered lens for long distance, say -2.00 and -1.00, and for computer work long sighted specs at say +1 - ?

Patrea,

Your idea is just about right.  If you are getting new prescription glasses, get your normal -3/-1.5 for important things like driving and routine work, but get a second pair of under-corrected  "workout glasses" with the -2/-1 or even -2/-0.5 to build up your eye strength.  Since you are well aware of the "oscillation" principle, be careful to use these for limited periods of time at first, then gradually longer as you adapt.  Eventually, you want to "even out" your eyes, so paradoxically you may want to slightly "handicap" your stronger eye in order to "force" the weaker right eye to pick up some slack and start working harder.  One way to do that is to actually put a patch or diffuser over the lens of the stronger eye; an alternative is to use a much stronger under-correction on the strong eye so that it "gives up" and lets the weak eye do the work.  So you could get a "workout" pair that has a -2/0 prescription, where the "0" is what they call "plano" or zero correction.  Then the right eye will work harder to focus, while the left eye "gives up" for a while.  Again, oscillate between an hour doing this, and several hours with normal lenses or even resting by doing activities that don't require any glasses.

For extended close up work, at the computer or reading, switch to the +1 lenses, though you may find that +1.5 or even +2 are tolerable -- try out the cheap "reading" glasses at the pharmacy to see what allows you to just barely get a sharp image when reading from 18'' back, or whatever your normal distance is from the computer screen when you work.  Another option, as I mentioned in one of my replies to skirrel above, if you use contact lenses, you can wear the plus lenses over your contacts.

Just as with exercise and nutrition, there are many ways to improve.  As long as your understand the principles of Hormetism (applied hormesis) -- which you obviously do -- you can use your creativity and your specific circumstances to devise a routine that will work for you!

Todd


Offline skirrel

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Re: Eyesight without glasses
« Reply #20 on: August 25, 2010, 07:30:21 PM »
so if ur eyes have uneven strength, how exactly does one eye work harder than the other?  Is it because of the mind?

Offline Todd Becker

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Re: Eyesight without glasses
« Reply #21 on: August 28, 2010, 11:44:06 AM »
so if ur eyes have uneven strength, how exactly does one eye work harder than the other?  Is it because of the mind?

skirrel,

The left and right eyes each start out with slightly different strengths, due to natural genetic or environmental variations.  But over-reliance on one eye over the other can lead to the stronger eye bearing more of the "vision load" than the weaker eye.  With time, this can lead to some atrophy of the focal capability of the weaker eye.

By analogy, people who have strokes often end up with a weak and and a strong hand.  The normal response is to rely mostly on the strong hand, but this often results in atrophy of the strength or dexterity of the weak hand.  On the Rehabilitation page of this blog, I describe a technique called Constraint Induced Movement Therapy, which helps stroke victims recovery by having them place their strong hand in a "mitt", thereby forcing them to use their weak hand.  They must do repetitive exercises with the individual fingers of the impaired hand, until it eventually matches the strength of the stronger hand.  Then the mitt can be removed.

Exactly the same phenomenon is the case with weak and strong eyes.  To strengthen the weak eye, you must stop relying so much on the strong eye.  This can be done by using a patch or a diffuser lens over the stronger eye, or by "handicapping" the stronger eye with an extreme undercorrection, so that you must now being relying on the weak eye if you want to see anything in focus.  But remember, that if the defocus is too extreme, even the weak eye will "give up", just as trying to lift a weight that is beyond your strength will result not in getting stronger, but in your weak arm "giving up".

Make sense?

Offline skirrel

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Re: Eyesight without glasses
« Reply #22 on: September 22, 2010, 05:59:22 PM »
will the weak eye become worse if it "gives up"

Offline Todd Becker

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Re: Eyesight without glasses
« Reply #23 on: September 22, 2010, 07:17:36 PM »
will the weak eye become worse if it "gives up"

skirrel,

It depends on how much weaker it is than the strong eye.  Again, think by analogy with your arms.  If one arm is slightly stronger than the other, you'll still use both arms when lifting heavy objects, but you'll rely more on the strong arm.  If one arm is very weak, however, you'll rely almost totally on the strong arm to lift things.

It's even more so with eyes, since their focal abilities are not under voluntary control.  If one eye is significantly less able to focus than the other, it won't even make the attempt.  As you put it, the weak eye will just "give up".  That doesn't mean it will lose its ability to focus, but it will progressively weaken as it gets "out of practice".

The solution:  "handicap" the strong eye with plus lenses (in the case of myopia) or use a patch or diffuser over the strong eye.  And let the weak eye go to work!  This is precisely the principle that constraint-induced movement therapy uses to restore the impaired function of arms, hands and fingers in individuals who have suffered a stroke.

Todd

Offline skirrel

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Re: Eyesight without glasses
« Reply #24 on: September 23, 2010, 02:56:12 PM »
so based on what you said, you've implied that if someone with high myopia did not wear any correction/undercorrection and looked far away and it was very blurry, their eyes would give up and worsen?

Offline Todd Becker

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Re: Eyesight without glasses
« Reply #25 on: September 24, 2010, 04:59:40 PM »
so based on what you said, you've implied that if someone with high myopia did not wear any correction/undercorrection and looked far away and it was very blurry, their eyes would give up and worsen?

skirrel,

Yes.  If the blur is too great, the eyes will not attempt to accommodate.  But in reality, in the situation you describe of going without any glasses, it is likely that a person will notice things that happen to be closer and not in the far distance.  By starting to focus on these, and objects slightly further away, vision will begin to improve without glasses.  And eventually, with time, the maximum focal distance can begin to increase again.

The more common situation, however, is that one eye is stronger than the other.  As long as you rely on the stronger eye to do the "focusing work", the weaker eye will not pitch in and help.  So my main suggestion in the earlier post was to "handicap" the stronger eye to let the weaker eye do more of the work, and thereby grow stronger.

Todd

Offline skirrel

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Re: Eyesight without glasses
« Reply #26 on: September 25, 2010, 02:29:35 PM »
well thats wierd because i've noticed that my eyes get worse when i look at close objects for too long. but when i go without correction and look far away for a really long time, and have done this many times, my eyesight does not get worse and maybe have improved just a teeny bit

Offline Todd Becker

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Re: Eyesight without glasses
« Reply #27 on: September 25, 2010, 06:05:10 PM »
well thats wierd because i've noticed that my eyes get worse when i look at close objects for too long. but when i go without correction and look far away for a really long time, and have done this many times, my eyesight does not get worse and maybe have improved just a teeny bit

There's no contradiction. As your own experience demonstrates, doing close work (reading or computers) for extended periods of time, without a break, will tend to worsen your eyesight.  Eventually it leads to stronger myopia. By contrast, looking into the distance for long times will tend to counteract the myopia.

It is precisely this observation which led to the invention of plus lens therapy!  By wearing plus lenses while working at the computer or doing near work, your focal range and eye shape are changed so that your eyes behave exactly as if they were looking into the distance! The constant strain of near work is alleviated, and when you take off the plus lenses your eyes are already adjusted to focus on the middle and far distance.  Try it and let me know if you notice the difference.

Perhaps I misunderstood your original question:

so based on what you said, you've implied that if someone with high myopia did not wear any correction/undercorrection and looked far away and it was very blurry, their eyes would give up and worsen?

which was a follow up to your earlier question:

will the weak eye become worse if it "gives up"

So I assumed you were talking about looking into the far distance under circumstances where your myopia is so severe that everything is very blurry.  This might apply if your myopia is greater than about -5.  If it is that severe, your eye(s) may not even make the attempt to focus. They'll stay in a blur. If your myopia is moderate, then looking at distant objects can be very helpful.  The key is whether you can see well enough to at least begin to focus.  That is why I suggested that when you go without glasses, you focus first on objects in the middle distance, right at the edge of your focal range, and progressively lengthen the distance that you can see without glasses:

...in the situation you describe of going without any glasses, it is likely that a person will notice things that happen to be closer and not in the far distance.  By starting to focus on these, and objects slightly further away, vision will begin to improve without glasses.  And eventually, with time, the maximum focal distance can begin to increase again.

Hope that makes things clearer (no pun intended).

Todd
« Last Edit: September 25, 2010, 06:21:17 PM by Todd Becker »

Offline Matt22

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Re: Eyesight without glasses
« Reply #28 on: October 08, 2010, 12:05:20 PM »
Hey I'm new here am just starting using undercorrections and reading at the edge off my focusing capabiltys to hopefully reduce my glasses prescription. I'm about -4.5 diopters. I 'm wondering if people could tell me how much myopia they have managed to get rid off with these methods. If I could loss a diopter or so I'd be amazingly happy. I wish I found out about retinal defocus and the wearing of undercorrections when I was younger. Are the improvement made due to the eye graudually changing shape as we pushing it to focus?
Thanks for any response.

Offline Cindy

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Re: Eyesight without glasses
« Reply #29 on: October 08, 2010, 05:50:02 PM »
Hello, Matt22, welcome to the forum!  I had myopia of -3 in my left eye and -2.5 in my right eye when I start in with the plus lenses. I noticed very rapid progress at first, and was able to switch to some older glasses I had kept which were -2 in both eyes.  I no longer wear any glasses even when driving!  Sometime when I get tired, my distance vision is a little blurry so I keep my glasses around just in case, but I don't ever use them. I really recommend using plus lenses. Stick with it - good luck!

Cindy