Author Topic: Cannabis and Hormesis  (Read 2949 times)

Offline thomas_seay

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Cannabis and Hormesis
« on: March 07, 2011, 11:02:12 AM »
I have been thinking about ways to increase neurogenesis in the hippocampus.  According to this study, looks like small doses of marijuana might be able to accomplish this. 

To make things more complicated, acute, low doses of cannabinoids have been found to induce anxiolytic-like effects in rodents (44, 49, 52, 53). These complicated effects of high and low doses of acute and chronic exposure to cannabinoids may explain the seemingly conflicting results observed in clinical studies regarding the effects of cannabinoid on anxiety and depression (3, 4, 10).

http://www.jci.org/articles/view/25509

I don't see in this study what constitues a "small dose".  Maybe one bong hit?  ;D

I am also thinking about LSD in this regard. 

Offline thomas_seay

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Re: Cannabis and Hormesis
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2011, 10:04:59 AM »
Here is a study in which

Regional brain abnormalities associated with long-term heavy cannabis use.” Arch Gen Psychiatry.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18519827

The above title emphasizes that this was "heavy" cannabis use that was .  However, when I see these studies being cited, the biphasic nature of marijuana is never mentioned and it is almost always stated that some studies show marijuana to be neurogenetic as regards the hippocampus and others show it to be detrimental.

Offline dee

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Re: Cannabis and Hormesis
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2011, 08:49:57 AM »
I have been thinking about ways to increase neurogenesis in the hippocampus.  According to this study, looks like small doses of marijuana might be able to accomplish this. 

To make things more complicated, acute, low doses of cannabinoids have been found to induce anxiolytic-like effects in rodents (44, 49, 52, 53). These complicated effects of high and low doses of acute and chronic exposure to cannabinoids may explain the seemingly conflicting results observed in clinical studies regarding the effects of cannabinoid on anxiety and depression (3, 4, 10).

http://www.jci.org/articles/view/25509

I don't see in this study what constitues a "small dose".  Maybe one bong hit?  ;D

I am also thinking about LSD in this regard. 

Yep, seems like it:
http://www.ted.com/talks/dean_ornish_says_your_genes_are_not_your_fate.html